Is it practically possible to stop hating each other?

I am often reminded (more often than not by people who have found 'mystic' bliss and I mean it in a good way) that we fight with each other, way too much. I don't think many people can disagree with that. Also, I think it is safe to assume we tend to take strong sides:

"I am a liberal"
"I am an atheist"
"I am more of a folk-rock person"

There is a inherent human need to "belong" - a religion/ sports-team/ country/ profession/ music ... any broad or niche system.

"What kind of a person am I?"

There are a lot of belief systems that propose diametrically opposing things. Often survival (for all practical reasons) depends on the downfall of the other system. I know there is "gamesmanship" and there is "sportsmanship". It is expected that you compete hard and find a way to respect the opponent. But that's common in sports because there are rules that both the parties agree to follow. Games come to a logical end and hence it is relatively easier to respect and even understand other belief systems. That doesn't happen in real life. As I mentioned in one of my earlier posts - nothing really comes to an end in real life. In our intensity to support our cause we often tend to forget the "unwritten rules". 

In one of the TED talks, Elizabeth Lesser described how half-witted we sound when we generalize people. This brings me to the questions I want to ask you today. Lets put aside the thought of what "should" happen and how "should" people behave with each other and try to imagine:

-  Is our commitment to a particular belief system primarily responsible in making us go against each other, with moral certainty?

- If you have a fair (or let's say deep) understanding of different points of view, does it hamper you ability to pursue any one of them?

- Will people still pursue their beliefs with the same intensity if they understand, respect and accept the merits of opposing beliefs? 

- If "progress depends on the unreasonable", is it possible that progress can be hindered if people stop challenging each others view?

- Is it practically possible for people to stop hating each other? What will the world look like, if that happened? I can't really imagine. Can you?

4 comments:

  1. I will take it on question wise:-
    (a) Yes, it is belief system i think responsible. We name it Sanskar. By habit we behave like a judge and keep giving judgement even uncalled for.
    (b) Very difficult. Stability of mind in understanding does not come easily but still possible when one follows the path of unconditional love.
    (c) Accept you win, expect you loose.
    (d) One from Rony, long time back, "Do not speak until you can improve the silence".In an adverse situation, it is better to be quiet and accept.
    (e) You switch over to SATYUG, at least for some period till hate like situation resurface.
    A very interesting topic I must admit.

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  2. I will take it on question wise:-
    (a) Yes, it is belief system that I think responsible. We name it Sanskar. By habit we behave like a judge and keep giving judgment even uncalled for.
    (b) Very difficult. Stability of mind in understanding does not come easily but still possible when one follows the path of unconditional love.
    (c) Accept you win, expect you loose.
    (d) One from Rony, long time back, "Do not speak until you can improve the silence”. In an adverse situation, it is better to be quiet and accept.
    (e) You switch over to SATYUG, at least for some period till hate like situation resurface.
    A very interesting topic I must admit.

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  3. I tend to agree with a lot of what you say, but I don't think we will ever stop hating each other.
    Hatred - and intolerance - are inbred in human nature. How do you undo/change thousands of years of human action/reaction?
    Also, hatred is often a cultural/religious thing. Some religions (Buddhism) preach peace and actually practice it.
    Others like Christianity preach peace and wage war in the name of peace. As for the Muslims, each sect and country has its own interpretation.
    Sad to say, hatred is here to stay and will dominate the earth for as long as man is in existence, and may very well be the reason why man ceases to exist at all.

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  4. I think it is possible to challenge another point of view without hating the person who holds it. But it might be that this can be done only for 'non-critical' beliefs. Critical beliefs, the ones we build our lives on, which we have moral certainty about, are a different ball game. Its difficult (and hence usually impossible) to have a reasonable 'what might be true for me might not be true for him' kind of an attitude towards such beliefs being challenged.

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